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Monaco GP: Tyre and Pit Stop Strategy

By saltire | 27 May 2013 | 10 Comments | 9,242 views

Mercedes finally made good on their qualifying promise to claim the teams’ maiden win of the season. A flawless drive from pole to chequered flag saw Nico Rosberg take the second win of his career, finishing ahead of Vettel and Webber who took the remaining podium positions. This was a race where safety car intervention and tyre strategy played an equal role in the final result.

As always, there are winners and losers when a safety car is deployed; the timing the the first, just after the initial round of planned stops, was crucial in determining the final result. Indeed, with overtaking proving difficult at this circuit, Hamilton’s drop from second to fourth saw the top four order fixed until the end.

In terms of durability, there seemed little to choose between the compounds on offer with most opting for a one stopper; Vergne managed a 38 lap stint with the supersoft whilst Di Resta drove one lap less on the softs.


Tyre Strategy
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10 Comments »

  • Tish

    Although 2 pits are registered in number total for Raikkonen, the graph is missing to show he pitted 2nd time on L71 due to puncture.

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  • Turbinaria

    Then Kimi to end with 2 pit stops, and most of others with 1 pit stop!
    vice versa was expected to be ( only Kimi to end the race with 1 pit stop), but SC has their word in the race, and Sergio too :P

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  • Mav

    One-stopping?!?

    Pirelli promised 2 to 3 stops. Rubbish. They need to make the tyres softer and less durable. F1 is a joke. Blah, blah, blah…

    :P

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  • ShoneVKG

    I can’t find 38lap stint on SS from Vergne? Is it right?

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  • saltire (author)

    Tish,

    Sorted now, thank you.

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  • saltire (author)

    ShoneVKG,

    I can’t see it on the graph either but Pirelli’s press release gave those figures, perhaps that includes outlaps?

     photo 7a8009b4-2c30-49ee-aeb7-34d6e7fe11bc.jpg

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  • Ross Scott

    Could anyone please help me with a newbie question?
    I keep hearing Rosberg led every lap in Monte Carlo. I don’t understand how you can be leading, pull into the pits for the mandatory pit stop(even if it’s only for a 3 second pit stop), accelerate and emerge from the pits still in first place. Could you please explain how that is possible or is there another explanation? Thanks!

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  • saltire (author)

    Ross Scott,
    He did lead every lap. http://184.106.145.74/f1-championship/f1-2013/f1-2013-06/Race%20Lap%20Chart.pdf

    I think this happened here not because he had a twenty second advantage ahead of Hamilton when he pit but rather it was because he came in for a stop under the safety car when Vettel and Webber had already made their stops. At this point Hamilton was still the driver immediately behind Rosberg (and he made his stop just after Rosberg) so by making his pit stop behind the safety car it was effectively free, this allowed him to re-take the lead position behind the safety car as that had already picked up and held back Vettel and Webber.

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  • Ross Scott

    saltire,

    Thanks for this explanation…and when Hamilton later emerged from his stop, he was not as fortunate and was squeezed out of his original position by Vettel and Webber…is that right?

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  • saltire (author)

    Ross Scott,

    Yep, that’s the way I see it.

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